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Frederic Mishkin

Frederic Mishkin

Professor, Columbia Business School
Frederic S. Mishkin is the Alfred Lerner Professor of Banking and Financial Institutions at the Graduate School of Business, Columbia University.  He is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a member of the Squam Lake Working Group on Financial Reform, and the co-director of the U.S. Monetary Policy Forum.  From September 2006 to August 2008 he was a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.  He has also been a senior fellow at the FDIC Center for Banking Research, and past president of the Eastern Economic Association.  Since receiving his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1976, he has taught at the University of Chicago, Northwestern University, Princeton University and Columbia.  From 1994 to 1997 he was executive vice president and director of research at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and an associate economist of the Federal Open Market Committee of the Federal Reserve System.

More About Frederic Mishkin

Mishkin talks about central bank monetary policy, the economy and the financial markets.

Thursday, May 3, 2012

Mishkin discusses the U.S. financial crisis that began in 2007 and the role of the Federal Reserve to stem the turmoil.

Monday, March 28, 2011

How the financial crisis has changed the thinking of both macro/monetary economists and central bankers, and the extent to which the science of monetary policy needs to be altered.

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

Monetary policy is more potent during financial crises because aggressive monetary policy easing can make adverse feedback loops less likely.

Friday, May 1, 2009

How much of a risk to inflation is posed by a depreciation of the domestic currency?

Friday, March 7, 2008

The rationale for greater flexibility in monetary policy during periods of financial disruptions.

Friday, January 11, 2008