Upcoming Debates
Clea Chang

Clea Chang

Wednesday, 03 February 2016 00:00

Lifespans Are Long Enough

  • IanGround 90px

    For

    Ian Ground

    Philosopher & Lecturer, University of Newcastle

  • Aubrey-de-Grey 90px 2

    Against

    Aubrey de Grey

    Chief Science Officer & Co-Founder, SENS Research Foundation

  • BrianKennedy

    Against

    Brian Kennedy

    CEO & President, Buck Institute for Research on Aging

  • PaulRootWolpe 90px

    For

    Paul Root Wolpe

    Director, Emory Center for Ethics

  • Reception: 5:45-6:30 PM
  • Debate: 6:45-8:30 PM
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  • Kaufman Center 
    129 West 67th Street
    (b/w Broadway and Amsterdam)
    New York, NY 10023 

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Thursday, 14 January 2016 10:33

The U.S. Should Let in 100,000 Syrian Refugees

Since the Syrian Civil War began in 2011, more than 4 million Syrians have fled the country, creating the greatest refugee crisis since World War II. Most have fled to Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan, but many have risked death to reach Europe and the possibility of a better life. Unlike Europe and Syria’s neighbors, the United States has had the advantage of picking and choosing from afar, taking in just over 2,000 Syrian refugees since the war’s start. The Obama administration has pledged to take another 10,000 in 2016, but there are some who suggest that we are falling well below the number that we can and should accept. What are our moral obligations, and what are the cultural, economic, and security issues that must be taken into account? Should the U.S. let in 100,000 Syrian refugees?

Wednesday, 13 January 2016 00:00

The U.S. Should Let In 100,000 Syrian Refugees

  • Robert Ford 90px

    For

    Robert Ford

    Sr. Fellow, Middle East Inst. & Fmr. U.S. Ambassador to Syria

  • David-Frum90px

    Against

    David Frum

    Senior Editor, The Atlantic

  • JessicaVaughan 90px

    Against

    Jessica Vaughan

    Dir. of Policy Studies, Center for Immigration Studies

  • DavidMiliband 90px

    For

    David Miliband

    President & CEO, International Rescue Committee & Fmr. U.K. Foreign Secretary

  • Reception: 5:45-6:30 PM
  • Debate: 6:45-8:30 PM
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  • Kaufman Center 
    129 West 67th Street
    (b/w Broadway and Amsterdam)
    New York, NY 10023 

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The Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution provides that: "No State shall … deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.” Yet many state universities give substantial preferences to certain races in their admissions decisions. In Regents of the University of California v. Bakke (1978), the Supreme Court approved such preferences, but the case was close, and controversial, and the question will be back before the Supreme Court this term. One side may argue that these preferences level the playing field, remedy prior discrimination, and enhance diversity within the classroom, thus redeeming the true promise of equal protection. But the other may say that these preferences – in favor of some races, at the expense of others – are racial discrimination pure and simple, the precise evil that the Equal Protection Clause was intended to forbid.

  • RogerClegg90px

    For

    Roger Clegg

    President & General Counsel, Center for Equal Opportunity

  • DeborahArcher90

    Against

    Deborah Archer

    Director, Racial Justice Project & Professor, New York Law School

  • ErwinChemerinsky90px

    Against

    Erwin Chemerinsky

    Dean, University of California, Irvine School of Law

  • StuartTaylor90px

    For

    Stuart Taylor, Jr.

    Nonresident Fellow, Brookings & Co-Author, Mismatch

  • Reception: 5:45-6:30 PM
  • Debate: 6:45-8:30 PM
  •  
  • Kaufman Center 
    129 West 67th Street
    (b/w Broadway and Amsterdam)
    New York, NY 10023 

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Thursday, 19 November 2015 12:13

Central Banks Can Print Prosperity

Central banks all around the world have been printing money. This policy, known as quantitative easing in banker jargon, has driven up the price of stocks and bonds. But will it lead to real and sustainable increases in global growth, or is it sowing the seeds of future inflation?

Wednesday, 18 November 2015 00:00

Central Banks Can Print Prosperity

  • Roger Bootle 90px

    For

    Roger Bootle

    Executive Chairman, Capital Economics

  • Conard90px

    Against

    Edward Conard

    Visiting Scholar, AEI & Former Partner, Bain Capital

  • Andrew Huszar90px

    Against

    Andrew Huszar

    Sr. Fellow, Rutgers Business School

  • Simon Johnson 90px New

    For

    Simon Johnson

    Professor, MIT & Fmr. Chief Economist, IMF

  • Reception: 5:45-6:30 PM
  • Debate: 6:45-8:30 PM
  •  
  • Kaufman Center 
    129 West 67th Street
    (b/w Broadway and Amsterdam)
    New York, NY 10023 

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Monday, 16 November 2015 11:43

U.S. Prosecutors Have Too Much Power

Today, a national debate rages about the functioning of our criminal justice system. Is it fair? Does it serve the ends of justice and public safety? Does it apply equally to all? Prosecutors, endowed with both autonomy and immunity, hold immense power within this system. They control secret grand jury proceedings, who will be prosecuted, and the specifics of charges. Moreover, those charges are often based on complex laws -- and enforced by long mandatory minimum prison sentences -- creating strong incentives for defendants to capitulate to lesser charges, perhaps even to crimes they did not commit. Indeed, more than 90% of both federal and state court cases never go trial, but instead are resolved through plea bargaining. Autonomy and secrecy, complex criminal code and mandatory minimums -- in combination, these factors have given prosecutors enormous leverage, and the opportunity to wield it relentlessly and selectively. The results, critics charge, are the undermining of the right to jury trial, mass incarceration, public skepticism regarding equal justice, and immense pressure on every defendant. Yet there can be no justice without empowered prosecutors. And is abuse really endemic? Isn't the national crime rate down over the long-term, showing that these powers work? And would changes reducing the leverage of prosecutors in the criminal justice system weaken their critical responsibility to prosecute crimes of great complexity, keep communities and the nation safe, and secure justice? Do prosecutors have too much power?

If you could take a pill that would help you study and get better grades, would you? Off-label use of “smart drugs” – pharmaceuticals meant to treat disorders like ADHD, narcolepsy, and Alzheimer’s – are becoming increasingly popular among college students hoping to get ahead, by helping them to stay focused and alert for longer periods of time. But is this cheating? Should their use as cognitive enhancers be approved by the FDA, the medical community, and society at large? Do the benefits outweigh the risks?

Tuesday, 10 November 2015 00:00

U.S. Prosecutors Have Too Much Power

  • PaulButler90px

    For

    Paul Butler

    Fmr. Federal Prosecutor & Professor, Georgetown Law

  • DavidHoffman90px

    Against

    David Hoffman

    Fmr. Federal Prosecutor & Partner, Sidley Austin

  • Reid Schar 90px

    Against

    Reid Schar

    Fmr. Federal Prosecutor & Partner, Jenner & Block

  • NancyGertner90px

    For

    Nancy Gertner

    Fmr. Federal Judge & Sr. Lecturer, Harvard Law

  • Debate: 6:30-8:00 PM CST
     
  • Thorne Auditorium @
    Northwestern Pritzker School of Law
    375 East Chicago Avenue
    Chicago, IL 60611

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