Upcoming Debates
Clea Chang

Clea Chang

Income inequality has been on the rise for decades. In the last 30 years, the wages of the top 1% have grown by 154%, while the bottom 90% has seen growth of only 17%. As the rungs of the economic ladder move further and further apart, conventional wisdom says that it will become much more difficult to climb them. Opportunities for upward mobility—the American dream—will disappear as the deck becomes stacked against the middle class and the poor. But others see inequality as a positive, a sign of a dynamic and robust economy that, in the end, helps everyone. And contrary to public opinion, mobility has remained stable over the past few decades. If the American dream is dying, is it the result of income inequality? Or is disparity in income a red herring where more complex issues are at play?
  • Gould 90px

    For

    Elise Gould

    Senior Economist and Dir. of Health Policy Research, Economic Policy Institute

  • Conard90px

    Against

    Edward Conard

    Visiting Scholar, AEI & Former Partner, Bain Capital

  • Winship90px

    Against

    Scott Winship

    Fellow, Manhattan Institute

  • Hanauer90px

    For

    Nick Hanauer

    Entrepreneur & Venture Capitalist

  • Reception: 5:45-6:30 PM
  • Debate: 6:45-8:30 PM
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  • Kaufman Center 
    129 West 67th Street
    (b/w Broadway and Amsterdam)
    New York, NY 10023 

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Some say that the mass collection of U.S. phone records is a gross invasion of privacy. Others say that it is necessary to keep us safe. But what does the U.S. Constitution say? "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.” Is collection of phone records a “search” or “seizure"? If so, is it “unreasonable”? Does it require a particularized warrant and probable cause? These are among the most consequential—and controversial—constitutional questions of our time.
  • Abdo90

    For

    Alex Abdo

    Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project

  • Baker90px

    Against

    Stewart Baker

    Fmr. Assistant Secretary, Homeland Security & Fmr. General Counsel, NSA

  • Yoo90px

    Against

    John Yoo

    Professor of Law, UC Berkeley & Fmr. Justice Department Lawyer

  • Wydra90px

    For

    Elizabeth Wydra

    Chief Counsel, Constitutional Accountability Center

  • Reception: 5:30-6:30 PM
  • Debate: 6:30-8:00 PM
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  • F.M. Kirby Auditorium at the National Constitution Center 
    525 Arch Street, Independence Mall
    Philadelphia, PA 19106 

  • CAST YOUR VOTE
  • BUY TICKETS
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The rise of ISIS, the disintegration of Iraq, Syria’s ongoing civil war, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the promise and peril of the Arab Spring... What role should America play in the Middle East? For some, America’s restraint has been a sign of disciplined leadership. But for others, it has been a sign of diminished strength and influence. How do we strike a balance between our national interests, moral obligations, and the maintenance of world order? Are we simply recognizing the limitations of our power, or does this embattled region require a bolder, more muscular, American presence?
  • Miller 90px

    For

    Aaron David Miller

    V.P. for New Initiatives, Wilson Center & Fmr. U.S. Mideast Negotiator

  • Doran 90px

    Against

    Michael Doran

    Sr. Fellow, Brookings Institution & Fmr. Senior Director, National Security Council

  • Stephens 90px

    Against

    Bret Stephens

    Deputy Editor, Editorial Page, The Wall Street Journal

  • Pillar90-px

    For

    Paul Pillar

    Sr. Fellow, Georgetown’s Center for Security Studies & Fmr. National Intelligence Officer

  • Reception: 5:45-6:30 PM
  • Debate: 6:45-8:30 PM
  •  
  • Kaufman Center 
    129 West 67th Street
    (b/w Broadway and Amsterdam)
    New York, NY 10023 

  • CAST YOUR VOTE
  • SOLD OUT
  • {addthisevent}
Wednesday, 10 September 2014 11:03

Embrace The Common Core

In K-12 education, there is nothing more controversial than the Common Core State Standards, national academic standards in English and math. Adopted by more than 40 states, they were developed, in part, to address concerns that American students were falling behind their foreign counterparts and graduating high school without the necessary skills for college and the workforce. But is this the reform we’ve been looking for? Has the federal government overreached and saddled our schools with standards that have been flawed from the start? Or will the Common Core raise the bar and improve the quality of our children’s education?
Tuesday, 09 September 2014 00:00

Embrace The Common Core

  • Martin Headshot 90x90

    For

    Carmel Martin

    Exec. VP, Center for American Progress & Fmr. Assistant Secretary of Education

  • Burris Headshot 90x90

    Against

    Carol Burris

    Principal, South Side High School & Blogger, Washington Post’s “Answersheet”

  • Hess Headshot 90x90

    Against

    Frederick Hess

    Resident Scholar and Director of Educational Policy Studies, AEI

  • Petrilli-90

    For

    Michael Petrilli

    President, Fordham Institute & Co-Editor, Knowledge at the Core

  • Reception: 5:45-6:30 PM
  • Debate: 6:45-8:30 PM
  •  
  • Kaufman Center 
    129 West 67th Street
    (b/w Broadway and Amsterdam)
    New York, NY 10023 

  • CAST YOUR VOTE
  • BUY TICKETS
  • {addthisevent}
Tonight, four superbly qualified high school students from the Stanford National Forensic Institute, with support from Minerva Project, will continue an Intelligence Squared U.S. Debate presented in April 2014.
Friday, 01 August 2014 15:29

Frederick Hess

An educator, political scientist and author, Frederick M. Hess studies K-12 and higher education issues. His books include Cage-Busting Leadership, Education Unbound, and Common Sense School Reform. He is also the author of the popular Education Week blog, "Rick Hess Straight Up." Hess's work has appeared in scholarly and popular outlets such as Teachers College Record, Harvard Education Review, The Chronicle of Higher Education, the Washington Post, the Atlantic and National Review. He has edited widely cited volumes on the Common Core, the role of for-profits in education, education philanthropy, school costs and productivity, the impact of education research, and No Child Left Behind. A former high school teacher, Hess currently teaches at Rice University and the University of Pennsylvania and serves as executive editor for the influential education journal Education Next.