Domestic Policy - Related Tags

Intelligence Squared Debates Ask: Can Clean Energy Drive America’s Economic Recovery?

March 08, 2011

In the latest round in America’s premier debate series, Intelligence Squared Debates (IQ2US), Bill Ritter, the former governor of Colorado, who established the state as a leader in renewable energy joins Kassia Yanosek, co-founder of the U.S. Partnership for Renewable Energy Finance support the motion while Robert Bryce, author of “Power Hungry: The Myths of ‘Green’ Energy and the Real Fuels of the Future” and Steven Hayward, author of “Almanac of Environmental Trends” oppose it.

An Actual Debate...

January 19, 2011

For an actual debate on the law, here's a debate sponsored by Intelligence Squared US, featuring two authors whose writing I admire and follow: Paul Starr and Jonathan Cohn.

Vote Shows Wide Audience Support for the Obama Health Care Reform Bill

January 14, 2011

The debate, the first in IQ2US’s spring series “America’s House Divided,” was particularly timely given the planned House of Representatives vote to consider repealing the landmark health care reform bill. Arguments on both sides of the motion were passionate and insightful but in the end, one side had the clear support of the vast majority of the live audience in New York and the motion was rejected soundly.

Two Muslims, Playing Against Stereotype

November 30, 2010

Zeba Khan was born and raised in a middle-class home in Toledo, Ohio, and for nine years attended the local Jewish day school, The Hebrew Academy, going to morning minyan every day. She graduated in 1993. She says she would have continued on with her Jewish education but the school only went through sixth grade. “I knew Hebrew better than most of my classmates,” she recalled in a recent interview, “and I wanted a bat mitzvah.”

Airport Security: Let's Profile Muslims

November 29, 2010

As an American Muslim, I’ve come to recognize, sadly, that there is one common denominator defining those who’ve got their eyes trained on U.S. targets: MANY of them are Muslim—like the Somali-born teenager arrested Friday night for a reported plot to detonate a car bomb at a packed Christmas tree-lighting ceremony in downtown Portland, Oregon.

The TSA is Keeping the Skies Safe

November 26, 2010

Since 9/11, al Qaeda has not succeeded in launching another terrorist spectacular in the United States. But it has succeeded in provoking a spectacular debate about aviation security. Several weeks ago—and even earlier at some airports—the Transportation Security Agency (TSA) initiated full-body scans and enhanced pat-downs, including inspections of private parts, that in some quarters are fueling outrage.

Murdock: It's Time to Profile Terrorists at U.S. Airports

November 24, 2010

As Americans fly this Thanksgiving holiday, critics of new security measures are arriving at airports in kilts. Subsequent pat downs will be quite enhanced, indeed. Pre-flight screening has moved from safety to comedy. Before it devolves into tragedy, airline employees and government officials should start profiling terrorists. America must focus its finite capabilities on those who crave the destruction of planes and the people who ride them.

New York Audience Weighs in on Propriety of Racial & Religious Profiling at Airports

November 23, 2010

Intelligence Squared U.S., the Oxford-style debate series, an initiative of The Rosenkranz Foundation, hosted a debate last night on the motion, U.S. Airports Should Use Racial & Religious Profiling. Given the recent news of stepped up TSA security procedures at airports, the debate was well-timed and shed light on the complications around keeping America’s skies safe. At the debate’s conclusion, the side arguing in favor of using racial and religious profiling in airport screenings won the debate, though the crowd at NYU’s Skirball Center for the Performing Arts was closely divided.

'Dr. Doom' Squares Off Against Other Economists in Intelligence Squared Debate

October 27, 2010

Is big government stifling the American spirit? That was the question posed to panelists at last night's Intelligence Squared debate in the Skirball Center. Among the guests was Stern professor Nouriel Roubini, who was nicknamed "Dr. Doom" by the New York Times after he successfully predicted the financial crisis as early as September 2006.

The California as First "Failed State" Debate: Schwarzenegger, Davis, Whitman, and Jerry Brown

March 02, 2010

Is California America's first "failed state?"... It's a hot topic. You see it suggested in the press. It's spinning into the very high-stakes California governor's race. There was even a formal debate about it in late January in New York City. Schwarzenegger in particular was very struck by that debate, sponsored by Intelligence Squared, as he told me when we talked about it the other day. The event dripped with irony, as it featured Schwarzenegger's brother-in-law, Bobby Shriver, as the most prominent member of the team of three arguing that California is America's first "failed state."

California: America’s First Failed State

January 26, 2010

In the latest Intelligence Squared US debate, the audience agreed that the Golden State has lost its luster.

Audience in New York Declares California is the First Failed State

January 20, 2010

The evening’s winning team argued for the motion and included Santa Monica City Council member Bobby Shriver, the Economist’s Andreas Kluth, and journalist and founder of TheWrap.com Sharon Waxman.

Debating Gray Davis in New York: California Fails, Wins

January 20, 2010

You could say it wasn’t a fair fight. With a proposal like, “California is the First Failed State,” the debate on Tuesday seemed a foregone conclusion. Those of us who live in the state and watch the news trot out a litany of funeral announcements for successive state services – education, medical care for the poor, arts programs, government paychecks – kind of thought it was obvious.

America’s Role in Mexico’s Drug War

December 08, 2009

Forty years ago, the United States government began a "war on drugs" whose cost so far is estimated at $1 trillion, and rising. In 2006, newly elected Mexican President Felipe Calderón began a crackdown on the drug-smuggling cartels—a "war on drugs" that really is a war, involving military troops and weapons and more than 10,000 dead so far. Americans buy drugs from the cartels and sell them guns, and Washington arguably provided the example for the Mexican government's hard-line tactics. So is America to blame for Mexico's drug war? That was the topic at last week's Intelligence Squared US debate at New York University.

Audience Overwhelmingly Decides America is Fueling the Drug War in Mexico

December 03, 2009

The team in favor of the proposition, America is to Blame for Mexico’s Drug War, scored an undisputed victory with 72% of the audience at the debate’s conclusion siding with them.

The Road to Recovery

November 30, 2009

Whatever else they may do in office, presidents are largely judged—by the voters, if not historians—on their handling of the economy. So with unemployment edging into double digits, last week's Intelligence Squared US debate topic—"Obama's Economic Policies Are Working Effectively"—attracted the largest audience in the history of the series...

Arguing the Economy

November 18, 2009

“Obama’s economic policies are working effectively.” That was the motion that Intelligence Squared US put to its New York audience Monday night for a vote. One three-man team defended the president’s policies; another denounced them. Though the “anti” team ultimately lost the vote, it made the more compelling argument...

Eliot Spitzer: Obama Economic Policies Ineffective, A Continuation Of Bush

November 18, 2009

Are Obama's economic policies actually working? Intelligence Squared posed this question to six policy experts at a debate in New York this week.

Rattner v. Spitzer: A Battle Royale Over the U.S. Response to the Financial Crisis

November 17, 2009

Just hours after a government audit lambasted the New York Fed as meek in its role in AIG’s rescue last fall, two big names in the financial world sparred over similar questions of government heft–or lack thereof–in downtown Manhattan on Monday night.

Eliot Spitzer Ends Up on Losing End of Village Debate

November 17, 2009

Neither his trademark Cheshire-cat smile, nor his plucky self-confidence was enough to rescue former Gov. Eliot Spitzer from losing the vote Monday night.

Is ‘Buy American’ a Slogan Worth Preserving?

October 18, 2009

Published Sep 25, 2009
From the magazine issue dated Oct 5, 2009
Call it the Rubber-Chicken War—the looming trade dispute between the United States (which has announced punitive tariffs on imports of Chinese tires) and China (which is threatening retaliation against American poultry exports).

Who's to Blame: Washington or Wall Street?

March 29, 2009

It won't help anyone recoup the money lost in the housing bubble or the market crash or the recession, but there's a certain satisfaction in knowing where to put the blame.

Whodunit

March 17, 2009

An Oxford-style debate held last night at New York's Rockefeller University featured an argument over whether Washington or Wall Street "was more to blame for the financial crisis."

Up Next for Debate: Carbon Costs

November 16, 2008

A sequel to the ballyhooed debate in 2007 over the motion that "Global Warming is Not a Crisis" has been scheduled in New York City in January, this time exploring a new premise: "Major Reductions in Carbon Emissions are Not Worth the Money." Those in favor of the motion (some additions may come, organizers say) will be the "skeptical environmentalist" Bjorn Lomborg; Philip Stott, the British biogeographer who has become a prominent critic of global warming worriers; and Peter W. Huber, the Manhattan Institute scholar, lawyer and mechanical engineer who has written that energy waste is unavoidable and beneficial.

Police chief to join gun debate

October 27, 2008

Seattle Police Chief Gil Kerlikowske thinks having more guns in the community doesn't deter crime, and he plans to argue that Tuesday night in a New York City debate.

Where's Wayne?

October 27, 2008

Tonight in New York City, I'll be participating in a gun control debate hosted by Intelligence Squared, in partnership with National Public Radio.

A Show of Hands

September 18, 2008

NEW YORK--The other night we attended the first-of-the-season Intelligence Squared debate. We've been going to these for a while and always find them interesting and stimulating. This week's topic was health-care policy, and one of the panelists arguing for more federal control was former Enron adviser Paul Krugman.

Are Kidneys a Commodity?

May 26, 2008

Lloyd Cohen thinks people should have the right to buy or sell organs, an idea reviled by doctors. As of last Wednesday at 5:44 p.m., according to the minute-by-minute count on the Web site of the United Network for Organ Sharing, there were 75,629 people awaiting kidney transplants in the United States.

Legal Thinkers Clash in Debate on U.S. Surveillance

April 23, 2007

Better more domestic surveillance than another Sept. 11, 2001, type of attack on U.S. soil? That was the question in a lively, sold-out, Oxford-style debate sponsored by The Rosenkranz Foundation at the Asia Society's New York headquarters Wednesday night.