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Unresolved: The Techonomic Cold War With China

Unresolved: The Techonomic Cold War With China

Unresolved: The Techonomic Cold War with China
The BriefGet Up To Speed

President Xi Jinping has made it clear: When it comes to big data, advanced weaponry, and other innovations in tech and AI, China has plans to surpass the United States as the world’s next techonomic superpower. But between the trade war with the U.S., the ambitious Belt and Road Initiative, and an array of domestic challenges, are China’s goals outpacing its capacity? Or is China building and investing in strategic partnerships that will push the country toward global dominance?

A New Cold War?

"Beginning with a trade war, developing into an investment war, before metastasising into a new “technology war” as China and the United States now struggle to secure the commanding heights of the new technologies that will either drive, or destroy, the economies of the 21st century."

Wednesday, September 19, 2018
Kevin Rudd

"The West needs a plan like it had against the Soviet Union."

Monday, January 14, 2019
Hal Brands

 "The problem is that equating today’s competition in tech with the Cold War ignores the reality of the US and China’s interdependence and encourages policymakers’ worst instincts."

Wednesday, December 19, 2018
Graham Webster
The Next Silicon Valley Will Be in China

"Forty years ago, Shenzhen was a poor fishing village on the southern coast of China. Today, it's one of the fastest growing cities on the planet. CNN's Matt Rivers explores the rise of China's Silicon Valley where the country first experimented with the idea of free trade and foreign investment."

Sunday, November 18, 2018
Matt Rivers

“Beijing has picked 17 tech hubs across the country to transform from a manufacturing-reliant economy to one led by tech and innovation.”

Wednesday, December 12, 2018
Meng Jing & Amanda Lee

“China’s industrial policy is aimed at rapidly expanding its high-tech sectors and developing its advanced manufacturing base, but President Trump and other leaders of industrial democracies see the plan as a threat.”

Thursday, August 2, 2018
James McBride

"Beijing is considering delaying targets in its “Made in China 2025” program, Bloomberg News reported last week. The roadmap, which seeks to advance domestic production of critical technology, has been a key bone of contention in President Donald Trump’s trade war. Other reports said China may replace the program altogether and give foreign companies more access to its market."

Saturday, December 15, 2018
Anjani Trivedi
"Some U.S. officials are likely to see Beijing’s move away from its controversial Made in China 2025 policy as more cosmetic than real."
Wednesday, December 12, 2018
Lingling Wei & Bob Davis

"A year ago, Chinese President Xi Jinping stood before the 19th Communist Party Congress and laid out his ambitious plan for China to become a world leader by 2025 in advanced technologies such as robotics, biotechnology and artificial intelligence."

Sunday, October 7, 2018
Jackie Northam

"But a few years ago, China’s leaders decided they wanted the country to be known for a new kind of electronics– not only “Made in China”, but “Designed in China”. The authorities can’t exactly whip up innovation by decree, but the local government can influence real estate – and through a series of incentives and edicts, it began swapping out tenants. Many of the cheap electronics vendors packed up their boxes, while new technology businesses moved into refurbished office spaces: startups, investors and even patent attorneys."

Tuesday, February 13, 2018
Christina Larson

“Silicon Valley, the argument goes, is still where the best ideas, smartest money and hungriest entrepreneurs combine with a bang nowhere else can match. Or is it?”

Thursday, February 15, 2018
The Economist

“The tech revolution in China is ubiquitous in urban life. I use the messaging app WeChat for work calls and vacation bookings. I pay for a cup of coffee or a ride in a car with a scanned QR code on my phone.”

Monday, May 14, 2018
Alec Ash

“China may be in the middle of a tech battle with the United States, but that hasn't stopped some of its biggest companies from expanding their presence in Silicon Valley.”

Sunday, December 16, 2018
Sherisse Pham

"One Chinese technology executive said he worked 14 to 15 hours a day at least six days a week. Another said he worked every waking hour and forced himself to watch movies to relax."

Monday, November 5, 2018
Li Yuan

“Unlisted technology giants are attracting bigger and bigger private fundraising rounds, leaving less on the table for start-ups who need to raise their first two critical rounds of financing to get off the ground and scale up.”

Sunday, February 3, 2019
Georgina Lee & Eric Ng

“The trade dispute between the U.S. and China is disrupting Silicon Valley.”

Saturday, February 2, 2019
Michelle Quinn & Shen Hua
The Belt and Road Initiative Is a Trillion-Dollar Blunder

An immersive visual explainer that covers the One Belt projects, including the railway to London, Gwadar Port, the railway to Iran, the Asian gas pipeline, and Khorgos Gateway.

Tuesday, February 12, 2019
South China Morning Post

"After centuries of uneasy relations, imperial demands for tribute and occasional wars, much of Asia must now reckon with a giant Chinese neighbour that is much more than a trade partner. With wealth and success has come new confidence in a Chinese model and ambitions to share it."

Thursday, July 26, 2018
The Economist

"The Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) is an ambitious effort to deepen regional cooperation and improve connectivity on a trans-continental scale. While the scope of the initiative is still taking shape, the BRI consists primarily of the Silk Road Economic Belt, linking China to Central and South Asia and onwards to Europe, and the New Maritime Silk Road, linking China to the nations of South East Asia, the Gulf Countries, North Africa, and on to Europe. Six other economic corridors have been identified to link other countries to the Belt and the Road."

Friday, May 4, 2018
Michele Ruta
"Amid worries over high project costs, nations including Pakistan, Myanmar and Malaysia have canceled or backed away from previously negotiated BRI commitments in recent months. Many of these governments want to avoid the same fate as Sri Lanka, which had to hand over a strategic port to Beijing in 2017 when it couldn't pay off its debt to Chinese companies."
Thursday, January 17, 2019
Nyshka Chandran
"China’s signature foreign-policy project is a failure that the U.S. shouldn’t copy."
Thursday, December 6, 2018
Tanner Greer
"When former Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak was ousted from office in May 2018, it’s possible that no one was more dismayed than officials in Beijing. After all, Najib had granted China extraordinary access to Malaysia. Across the country, huge China-backed infrastructure projects were being planned or breaking ground. But as China’s presence in Malaysia swelled, a scandal was engulfing the prime minister’s office. Najib was accused of massive corruption linked to the development fund known as 1MDB."
Tuesday, January 15, 2019
Will Doig

"With the vast, ambitious investment project known as the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), China meant to pull the world closer, making itself the political and economic center of gravity for more than 60 countries within the project’s sweep."

Tuesday, January 29, 2019
Nadege Rolland

"China is currently the number one exporter of the world with over 2 billion dollars’ worth of goods exported. Trade has thus been one of the pillars of China’s overall economic expansion. However, the impact of domestic consumption is often neglected. China’s economic success is actually largely dependent on domestic consumption and that is problematic."

Tuesday, October 16, 2018
Steven Price

"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. A tale of two world leaders, U.S. president Donald Trump and China president Xi Jinping—both of whose countries have among the world’s best economies right now. But whereas Xi is playing Santa Claus to the rest of the world, doling out loans to finance-starved countries, Trump is playing Scrooge, waging an economic war with Canada, the European Union, China and others."

Sunday, February 4, 2018
Frank Holmes
"Mr. Xi’s Belt and Road initiative has offered hundreds of billions of dollars for railways, bridges and ports in dozens of countries, expanding its strategic influence along the way. Among the recipients are economies that have struggled to attract U.S. investment or adequate financing from multilateral banks. The Trump administration is looking to change that by helping the private sector invest. In October, President Trump signed into law the Build Act, which creates a new development finance agency that offers loans, loan guarantees and political-risk insurance to private companies."
Tuesday, November 13, 2018
Niharika Mandhana

"Most economists in a recent survey view a trade war between the U.S. and China as the biggest threat to the U.S. economy in 2019, a sign that forecasters view political uncertainty and the potential for new punitive tariff barriers as greater risks than macroeconomic or financial disruptions."

Thursday, December 13, 2018
Harriet Torry
"The US and China are locked in a damaging trade dispute that has seen both sides levy tariffs on billions of dollars worth of one another's goods."
Tuesday, February 5, 2019
BBC

“China has offered to go on a six-year buying spree to ramp up imports from the U.S., in a move that would reconfigure the relationship between the world’s two largest economies, according to officials familiar with the negotiations."

Friday, January 18, 2019
Bloomberg

“If a key goal is to make China a more market-driven economy that’s a responsible global player, then why are we encouraging it to act like a command economy where Beijing can instruct more purchases of US products?”

Monday, December 3, 2018
Jim Pethokoukis

“The U.S. is in a strong negotiating position because of its large trade imbalance.”

Tuesday, October 2, 2018
Mark Louchheim

"The big winners of the trade war will be those investors who have not fled for the exits and sold Trump short."

Tuesday, December 18, 2018
Stephen Moore
"But this economic logic is unlikely to sway Mr Trump right now, least of all when the White House is preparing for a meeting with Chinese president Xi Jinping. So it is worth asking why the bilateral statistics are moving the wrong way. Part of the explanation is — ironically — the US’s current economic strength: fast growth usually sucks in more imports. (Or, as some of Mr Trump’s own advisers used to half-jokingly tell him, with limited success, the easiest way to solve a trade deficit is to create a recession.)"
 
Thursday, November 15, 2018

"On one side, China’s problems are real. On the other, the Chinese government – hindered neither by rigid ideology nor by anything resembling a democratic political process – has repeatedly shown its ability and willingness to do whatever it takes to prop up its economy. It’s really anyone’s guess whether this time will be different, or whether Xi-who-must-be-obeyed can pull out another recovery."

Tuesday, January 15, 2019
Paul Krugman

"China’s growth of 6.6% last year was indeed the weakest since 1990, and the country does want to end the trade war. But a closer look at the data shows why its leaders are less panicked than Mr Trump might think."

Thursday, January 24, 2019
The Economist
The U.S. and China Will Both Lose the Trade War

"So far, the US has imposed three rounds of tariffs on Chinese goods, totalling more than $250bn."

Monday, January 7, 2019
BBC

"Most economists in a recent survey view a trade war between the U.S. and China as the biggest threat to the U.S. economy in 2019, a sign that forecasters view political uncertainty and the potential for new punitive tariff barriers as greater risks than macroeconomic or financial disruptions."

Thursday, December 13, 2018
Harriet Torry
"The US and China are locked in a damaging trade dispute that has seen both sides levy tariffs on billions of dollars worth of one another's goods."
Tuesday, February 5, 2019
BBC

“China has offered to go on a six-year buying spree to ramp up imports from the U.S., in a move that would reconfigure the relationship between the world’s two largest economies, according to officials familiar with the negotiations."

Friday, January 18, 2019
Bloomberg

“If a key goal is to make China a more market-driven economy that’s a responsible global player, then why are we encouraging it to act like a command economy where Beijing can instruct more purchases of US products?”

Monday, December 3, 2018
Jim Pethokoukis

“The U.S. is in a strong negotiating position because of its large trade imbalance.”

Tuesday, October 2, 2018
Mark Louchheim

"The big winners of the trade war will be those investors who have not fled for the exits and sold Trump short."

Tuesday, December 18, 2018
Stephen Moore
"But this economic logic is unlikely to sway Mr Trump right now, least of all when the White House is preparing for a meeting with Chinese president Xi Jinping. So it is worth asking why the bilateral statistics are moving the wrong way. Part of the explanation is — ironically — the US’s current economic strength: fast growth usually sucks in more imports. (Or, as some of Mr Trump’s own advisers used to half-jokingly tell him, with limited success, the easiest way to solve a trade deficit is to create a recession.)"
 
Thursday, November 15, 2018

"On one side, China’s problems are real. On the other, the Chinese government – hindered neither by rigid ideology nor by anything resembling a democratic political process – has repeatedly shown its ability and willingness to do whatever it takes to prop up its economy. It’s really anyone’s guess whether this time will be different, or whether Xi-who-must-be-obeyed can pull out another recovery."

Tuesday, January 15, 2019
Paul Krugman

"China’s growth of 6.6% last year was indeed the weakest since 1990, and the country does want to end the trade war. But a closer look at the data shows why its leaders are less panicked than Mr Trump might think."

Thursday, January 24, 2019
The Economist